Minimum wages revised by state of West Bengal

Current Labour Scenario in India - Labour Law ReporterThe West Bengal government has announced on 25.10.2011 the revised minimum monthly and daily wages in 31 industrial segments with the highest monthly and daily rates for those highly skilled at Rs.5,614 and Rs.215 respectively.

Announcing this in Kolkata on 25.10.2011, the State Labour Minister, Mr. Purnendu Bose, said that out of 55 industrial segments in the State, the minimum monthly and daily wages of 31 segments have been revised so far.

Of the remaining 24 segments, there are litigations in ten cases, and in ten other cases, the State government is waiting for more opinions if there is any, the Minister said.

The 31 industrial segments included, among others, bell metal and brass industry, ceramic industry, chakki mills, construction or maintenance of roads, flour mills, oil mills, paints and chemical factories, plastic industry, plywood industry, power looms, silk building industry, shoe making industry, rice mills, security services and agriculture. In some segments, employees have been categorised in three groups unskilled, semi-skilled and skilled, while in some segments, the employees have been categorised in four groups with the addition of highly skilled.

For those skilled, the revised highest minimum monthly and daily wages are Rs.5,104 and Rs.196 respectively. For semi-skilled, the revised highest minimum monthly and daily wages are Rs.4,640 and Rs.178 respectively.

For unskilled, the revised highest minimum monthly and daily wages are Rs.4,218 and Rs.162 respectively.

Finally, in agriculture sector, the revised minimum monthly wages are Rs.4,007 for skilled, Rs.3,643 for semi skilled, Rs.3,112 for unskilled without food and Rs.154, Rs.140 and Rs.127 daily wages without food respectively.

The revised minimum daily wages with food for skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled in agriculture sector are now Rs.145, Rs.131 and Rs.118 respectively.

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Posted on November 23, 2011, in Latest on Labour Law and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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